eWHALE News & Blog Posts

eWhale Media Releases

eWHALE News & Blog Posts

eWhale Media Releases

eWHALE News & Blog Posts

eWhale Media Releases

eWHALE News & Blog Posts

eWhale Media Releases

Blog Posts


Field Work in the Azores (July 2023)
Field Work in the Azores (July 2023)
©Lauren Rodriguez
Field Work in the Azores (July 2023)
Written by Lauren Rodriguez, PhD Candidate at the University of Innsbruck

Field Work in the Azores
Written by Lauren Rodriguez, PhD Candidate at the University of Innsbruck

Field Work in Italy (2023)
Field Work in Italy (2023)
©Elisa Remonato (Tethys)
Field Work in Italy (2023)
Written by Eleonora Barbaccia, PhD Candidate at the Politecnico di Milano

Field Work in Italy
Written by Eleonora Barbaccia, PhD Candidate at the Politecnico di Milano

Field Work in Iceland (2023)
Field Work in Iceland (2023)
©Belén García Ovide
Field Work in Iceland (2023)
Written by Belén García Ovide, PhD Student at the University of Iceland

Field Work in Iceland
Written by Belén García Ovide, PhD Candidate at the University of Iceland

News and Media Releases


 

ORF Sound - Planet Strange: Deep Dive - Will Whales Save Us?

Whales are the largest animals in the world. At the same time, we know very little about them. How are the whales doing? And can they help us in the fight against the climate crisis? And perhaps even save us?

 

ORF Science: Human "Bycatch" Raises Concerns

With water, air, and soil samples, it is possible to collect large amounts of data on different organisms and entire ecosystems. However, environmental samples often also contain genetic "bycatch" in the form of human DNA, raising ethical concerns about the use of the data and calls for clear regulations.

 

Science ORF: Environmental DNA Facilitates Whale Research

There is often little data on whales in European waters. As part of a cross-border research project, experts are collecting water samples and the genetic material contained in them together with the public to establish a comprehensive and non-invasive whale and biodiversity monitoring system.

 

Ö1 ORF - Wissen Aktuell: eDNA: Tracing in the Service of Whale Research

All living beings leave small genetic traces in the environment. This environmental DNA can provide valuable clues in criminal cases, but it is also used in biology to study rare animal species. At the University of Innsbruck, researchers aim to learn more about European whale populations with the help of eDNA.

 

ZDF - Terra X: Fascination Earth with Wotan Wilke Möhring - Icy Iceland

Few places in the world display the effects of climate change as clearly as here. But what are its impacts on whale populations in Iceland's waters? Scientists on site are investigating how many whales are swimming around Iceland at different times.

 

Der Standard: CSI Ocean - How to track whales in the sea

Marine mammals are difficult to find in the oceans. An international team under Austrian leadership is using modern forensic techniques.

 

Die Presse: First watch whales, then take water samples

Marine pollution and industrial whaling have caused the populations of many whale species to shrink significantly. To better define protected areas, more knowledge is needed. Now, laypeople are expected to help establish a monitoring system using environmental DNA.

 

MedinLive: Environmental DNA should help protect whales

To protect whales and other endangered marine creatures, as much data as possible is needed about these animals and the regions relevant to the preservation of biodiversity. In an international project led by a researcher from the University of Innsbruck, citizen scientists are now also expected to help. They can collect water samples during whale-watching tours. The DNA contained in these samples (environmental DNA) is expected to provide information about whales and other endangered species.

 

Labor Praxis: Whale Watching plus - collect environmental DNA for research and protection of whales

To effectively protect whales and other endangered marine species, their habitats must be safeguarded. An adequate data foundation is essential for this. A cross-border research project is now bringing together science, industry, and the public to establish a comprehensive, non-invasive whale and biodiversity monitoring system using water samples.

 

University of Innsbruck: Detective work at sea - whale research via environmental DNA

Detailed knowledge about whales in European waters will be provided by the Biodiversa+ project "eWHALE", which started in January and is led by molecular ecologist Bettina Thalinger from the University of Innsbruck. The transnational research project brings together partners from science, industry and the public to establish a far-reaching, non-invasive cetacean and biodiversity monitoring system using water samples.

 

University of Iceland: Detective work at sea - whale research via environmental DNA

Research scientists at the University of Iceland Research Centre in Húsavík are participating in a European research project called eWHALE, a transnational research project which brings together partners from science, industry and the public to establish a far-reaching, non-invasive cetacean and biodiversity monitoring system using water samples. Sampling for the research will in part be conducted during whale watching tours in Iceland, bringing in the citizen science aspect.

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